Acupuncture: Therapy without Therapy

Heart rate variability (HRV), a term used to define the extent of variation in your heart rate from its lowest beating speed to its fastest has been shown to influence our emotional health. In other words, the wider the range of your heart rate, the higher and better your emotional resilience. HRV, the beat-to-beat fluctuations in the rhythm of the heart, results from the regulation of the heart by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Low HRV is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality and is a marker for a wide range of diseases (1).london ontario naturopath

Conversely, if you’re able to maximize your heart rate variability, then you’re also increasing your emotional strength and resilience. Meditation, behavioural therapy, biofeedback, regular physical activity, and certain pharmaceuticals have been shown to improve HRV. Another therapy that has been shown to have a significant positive effect on HRV and consequently emotional health is acupuncture. I like to think of it as having ‘therapy’ without ‘therapy’. There is strong evidence from randomized placebo controlled trials in the literature to support the conclusion that acupuncture improves HRV (1,2). In the field of psychophysiology, the london ontario acupunctureinterest in HRV is in its relationship to emotional arousal. High-frequency (HF) activity has been found to decrease under conditions of acute time pressure and emotional strain and elevated state anxiety, presumably related to focused attention and motor inhibition(4,5). HRV has been shown to be reduced in individuals reporting a greater frequency and duration of daily worry. Acupuncture on the other hand has been shown to improve HRV. Specifically, stimulation of acupuncture points induced a significant decrease in heart rate (HR), HRV total power, low frequency (LF) power and ratio of low frequency to high frequency (LF/HF), and a significant increase in the HF power (2).

My interest in researching this link between the above health topics (HRV, mental health and acupuncture) was aroused by browsing through the following book: Wait: The Art and Science of Delay by Frank Partnoy. I highly recommend this book for a more positive attitude on procrastination and the importance of making decisions with both our minds and hearts.

References:
1. Anderson et al. 2012. Acupuncture and heart rate variability: a systems level approach to understanding mechanism BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 12(Suppl 1):P302 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/12/S1/P302
 2. Li Z, et al. 2005. Effects of acupuncture on heart rate variability in normal subjects under fatigue and non-fatigue state. . Eur J Appl Physiol. 2005 Aug;94(5-6):633-40. Epub 2005 May 20.
 3. Nickel, P.; F. Nachreiner (2003). “Sensitivity and Diagnosticity of the 0.1-Hz Component of Heart Rate Variability as an Indicator of Mental Workload”. Human Factors 45 (4): 575–590.
4. Jönsson, P. (2007). “Respiratory sinus arrhythmia as a function of state anxiety in healthy individuals”. International Journal of Psychophysiology 63: 48–54.

Weight Loss Weight Managment London Naturopath Weight loss Program Weight Managment Group Therapy Naturopath London St Marys Mt Brydges Weight Loss Program Weight Management Weightloss Weight-loss Healthy Nutrition Diet Exercise Body dysmorphic disorder Binge Eating Manage Cravings Cravings Food Weight-loss Fat Loss Tonify body Make muscle loss weight Program Healthy eating nutritionist program Naturopath Naturopath London ONtario Naturopathic Medicine

Homeopathy Nutrition Nutritionist Diet food Healthy  Pediatrics Arthritis Pain management

Weight Management Weight-loss support group therapy anxiety cravings stress acupuncture weight loss acupuncture weight loss

homeopathy nutrition diet weight loss migraine natural treatment meditation exercise therapy naturopath london ontario naturopathic medicine herbal naturopathy naturopathic doctor natural therapy natural doctor naturalpath naturalpath london ontario naturopathy naturopathic Medicine

Advertisements

About Negin

Graduate of natropathic Medicine based in London, Ontario
Gallery | This entry was posted in Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine, Depression & Anxiety, General Health, Heart Health and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s